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Prop. 14 Media Coverage from Capitol Weekly and California
Healthline

The campaign on behalf of a $5.5 billion stem cell ballot measure
this week placed an opinion piece on Capitol Weekly,
andCalifornia Healthline separately offered up a news
overview of the proposal, Proposition 14. 

The measure would save the California stem cell agency from
financial extinction and broadly expand its scope into new areas
ranging from mental health to “aging as a pathology.” The agency is
running out of the $3 billion that voters provided nearly 16 years
ago and will begin closing its doors this winter without a major
cash infusion. 


The piece on Healthline
referenced the 2004 ballot initiative
that created the agency. The article by Rachel Bluth
said,

“During that first campaign, voters were told research
funded by the measure could
lead to cures
for cancer, Alzheimer’s and other devastating
diseases, and that the state could reap millions
in royalties
from new treatments.

“Yet most of those ambitions remain unfulfilled.”

The article continued,

“The campaigns for both bond measures may be giving
people unrealistic expectations and false hope, said Marcy
Darnovsky
, executive director of the Center for Genetics and
Society
. ‘It undermines people’s trust in science,’ Darnovsky
said. ‘No one can promise cures, and nobody should.’

Robert Klein, a real estate developer who wrote both ballot
measures, disagrees…. He said some of (the agency’s)
breakthroughs are helping patients right now.’

“‘What are you going to do if this doesn’t pass? Tell those
people we’re sorry, but we’re not going to do this?’ Klein
said. ‘The thought of other children needlessly dying is
unbearable.'”

California Healthline is independently published by Kaiser Health News for the
California Health Care
Foundation
.

The Capitol Weekly
piece was written by Tracy Grikscheit, chief of pediatric
surgery at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, who has
received
nearly $15 million
from the stem cell agency. Children’s
has received
more than $32 million
from the agency. It has a longstanding
relationship with the University of Southern California,
which has
received more than $114 million from the agency
and which has
also had a representative on the agency’s board for a number of
years in the past.

The Capitol Weekly article largely consisted of well-worn
information from the campaign for Proposition 14.  Capitol Weekly
is an online news service covering state politics and
government.

The campaign on behalf of a $5.5 billion stem cell ballot measure
this week placed an opinion piece on Capitol Weekly,
andCalifornia Healthline separately offered up a news
overview of the proposal, Proposition 14. 

The measure would save the California stem cell agency from
financial extinction and broadly expand its scope into new areas
ranging from mental health to “aging as a pathology.” The agency is
running out of the $3 billion that voters provided nearly 16 years
ago and will begin closing its doors this winter without a major
cash infusion. 


The piece on Healthline
referenced the 2004 ballot initiative
that created the agency. The article by Rachel Bluth
said,

“During that first campaign, voters were told research
funded by the measure could
lead to cures
for cancer, Alzheimer’s and other devastating
diseases, and that the state could reap millions
in royalties
from new treatments.

“Yet most of those ambitions remain unfulfilled.”

The article continued,

“The campaigns for both bond measures may be giving
people unrealistic expectations and false hope, said Marcy
Darnovsky
, executive director of the Center for Genetics and
Society
. ‘It undermines people’s trust in science,’ Darnovsky
said. ‘No one can promise cures, and nobody should.’

Robert Klein, a real estate developer who wrote both ballot
measures, disagrees…. He said some of (the agency’s)
breakthroughs are helping patients right now.’

“‘What are you going to do if this doesn’t pass? Tell those
people we’re sorry, but we’re not going to do this?’ Klein
said. ‘The thought of other children needlessly dying is
unbearable.'”

California Healthline is independently published by Kaiser Health News for the
California Health Care
Foundation
.

The Capitol Weekly
piece was written by Tracy Grikscheit, chief of pediatric
surgery at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, who has
received
nearly $15 million
from the stem cell agency. Children’s
has received
more than $32 million
from the agency. It has a longstanding
relationship with the University of Southern California,
which has
received more than $114 million from the agency
and which has
also had a representative on the agency’s board for a number of
years in the past.

The Capitol Weekly article largely consisted of well-worn
information from the campaign for Proposition 14.  Capitol Weekly
is an online news service covering state politics and
government.

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