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Proposition 14: The Scientist Magazine Digs into
California’s Stem Cell Agency and the Ballot Measure

The Scientist magazine yesterday published
a more detailed look
at the state of California’s stem cell
agency and a $5.5 billion ballot measure that would send it into
arenas that it
has previously not explored.

The article by Katarina Zimmer said the California
Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM)
has “helped
transform its state into an innovation hub of stem cell science.” 
The article was more complete and detailed than many of the news
pieces prepared by California media.

Quoted by Zimmer were stem cell scientists Jeanne Loring,
co-founder of Aspen Neurosciences, Inc. of La Jolla;
Larry Goldstein of UC San Diego, and Jeff
Sheehy
, who has served on the CIRM board since its inception in
2004. 

Zimmer also cited
the 2012 Institute of Medicine (IOM) study
that was
commissioned by CIRM at a cost of $700,000. Directors of the agency
expected a “gold standard” endorsement of the agency, but the IOM
cited significant problems with conflicts of interest on the board.
The study also recommended major restructuring of the board and the
agency. 

An analysis last month by the California Stem Cell Report
showed that
79 percent of CIRM awards — $2.1 billion — has gone to
institutions that have links to past or present board
members. 

Robert Klein, the sponsor of the $5.5 billion Proposition
14, did not include any of the more significant recommendations
from the IOM in his 17,000-word, proposed revision of CIRM’s legal
charter. Klein was a strong advocate for commissioning the study by
the prestigious IOM.  Klein was not quoted by The Scientist. 

Zimmer’s piece covered many of the arguments pro and con on
Proposition 14 that are familiar to readers of this web site.
However, her piece is not likely to find significant numbers of
readers among California’s 20 million voters. Only a tiny fraction
of them read The Scientist magazine. 

However, The Scientist does reach a significant number of
persons globally that are interested in such things as stem cell
research.

For more on the IOM report and CIRM’s actions on its
recommendations, see the new book,
“California’s Great Stem Cell Experiment: An Inside Look at a $3
Billion Search for Stem Cell Cures.”

The Scientist magazine yesterday published
a more detailed look
at the state of California’s stem cell
agency and a $5.5 billion ballot measure that would send it into
arenas that it
has previously not explored.

The article by Katarina Zimmer said the California
Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM)
has “helped
transform its state into an innovation hub of stem cell science.” 
The article was more complete and detailed than many of the news
pieces prepared by California media.

Quoted by Zimmer were stem cell scientists Jeanne Loring,
co-founder of Aspen Neurosciences, Inc. of La Jolla;
Larry Goldstein of UC San Diego, and Jeff
Sheehy
, who has served on the CIRM board since its inception in
2004. 

Zimmer also cited
the 2012 Institute of Medicine (IOM) study
that was
commissioned by CIRM at a cost of $700,000. Directors of the agency
expected a “gold standard” endorsement of the agency, but the IOM
cited significant problems with conflicts of interest on the board.
The study also recommended major restructuring of the board and the
agency. 

An analysis last month by the California Stem Cell Report
showed that
79 percent of CIRM awards — $2.1 billion — has gone to
institutions that have links to past or present board
members. 

Robert Klein, the sponsor of the $5.5 billion Proposition
14, did not include any of the more significant recommendations
from the IOM in his 17,000-word, proposed revision of CIRM’s legal
charter. Klein was a strong advocate for commissioning the study by
the prestigious IOM.  Klein was not quoted by The Scientist. 

Zimmer’s piece covered many of the arguments pro and con on
Proposition 14 that are familiar to readers of this web site.
However, her piece is not likely to find significant numbers of
readers among California’s 20 million voters. Only a tiny fraction
of them read The Scientist magazine. 

However, The Scientist does reach a significant number of
persons globally that are interested in such things as stem cell
research.

For more on the IOM report and CIRM’s actions on its
recommendations, see the new book,
“California’s Great Stem Cell Experiment: An Inside Look at a $3
Billion Search for Stem Cell Cures.”

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