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Clinical Studies for Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia with
Stem Cell Therapy

Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia, affects
nearly 50 million people around the globe. That number is expected
to more than double in the next 30 years without effective
treatment. Currently, the treatments for dementia are only mildly
effective. The few dementia medications that are available simply
prolong the inevitable, slowing cognitive decline modestly.

Even with dementia medication, patients with Alzheimer’s
disease and most other dementias have progressive memory loss. Over
time they lose the ability to perform common everyday tasks. If
patients live long enough, they will become dependent on others for
all of their care. In this way, dementia is a devastating illness
for loved ones.


Alzheimer’s disease
and other dementias are neurodegenerative
diseases, which means nerve cells in the brain become dysfunctional
and die. As brain cells lose their ability to function, the person
loses the abilities those nerve cells once performed. Since brain
cells have little natural capacity to regenerate, once they are
sick and die, that particular brain function may be lost
forever.

Stem cells have long been an attractive potential option for
Alzheimer’s disease and dementia treatment. Since brain cells
become sick and die, the alternative option most recently looked at
is to restore and replace those cells with stem cells—cells that
can become brain cells? Indeed, stem cells may do so much more.
They release countless molecules that help brain cells grow and
survive. Not surprisingly, stem cells are the focus of intense
research as a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and other
neurodegenerative diseases.

Drs. Duncan and Valenzuela reviewed the current status of stem
cells as a possible
treatment
for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. The research
in animals has been incredibly promising. When stem cells are given
to lab animals with experimental dementia, the stem cells find
their way to the site of the disease and become new and healthy
brain cells.

The research in animals has been so promising, that a number of
Phase I and Phase II clinical trials in humans have been completed
or are underway. From these trials, we know that stem cells appear
to be safe for use in people with Alzheimer’s disease in that no
serious adverse events were tied to stem cell use. It is too early
to tell if these treatments will change the course of the disease
until results are published. For now, we remain cautiously
optimistic that the incredible effects of stem cells seen in
animals may also translate to the same benefits in humans.

Reference: Duncan T, Valenzuela M. Alzheimer’s disease,
dementia, and stem cell therapy. Stem Cell Res Ther. 2017;8(1):111.
Published 2017 May 12. doi:10.1186/s13287-017-0567-5

The post
Clinical Studies for Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia with Stem
Cell Therapy
appeared first on Stemedix.

Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia, affects
nearly 50 million people around the globe. That number is expected
to more than double in the next 30 years without effective
treatment. Currently, the treatments for dementia are only mildly
effective. The few dementia medications that are available simply
prolong the inevitable, slowing cognitive decline modestly.

Even with dementia medication, patients with Alzheimer’s
disease and most other dementias have progressive memory loss. Over
time they lose the ability to perform common everyday tasks. If
patients live long enough, they will become dependent on others for
all of their care. In this way, dementia is a devastating illness
for loved ones.


Alzheimer’s disease
and other dementias are neurodegenerative
diseases, which means nerve cells in the brain become dysfunctional
and die. As brain cells lose their ability to function, the person
loses the abilities those nerve cells once performed. Since brain
cells have little natural capacity to regenerate, once they are
sick and die, that particular brain function may be lost
forever.

Stem cells have long been an attractive potential option for
Alzheimer’s disease and dementia treatment. Since brain cells
become sick and die, the alternative option most recently looked at
is to restore and replace those cells with stem cells—cells that
can become brain cells? Indeed, stem cells may do so much more.
They release countless molecules that help brain cells grow and
survive. Not surprisingly, stem cells are the focus of intense
research as a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and other
neurodegenerative diseases.

Drs. Duncan and Valenzuela reviewed the current status of stem
cells as a possible
treatment
for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. The research
in animals has been incredibly promising. When stem cells are given
to lab animals with experimental dementia, the stem cells find
their way to the site of the disease and become new and healthy
brain cells.

The research in animals has been so promising, that a number of
Phase I and Phase II clinical trials in humans have been completed
or are underway. From these trials, we know that stem cells appear
to be safe for use in people with Alzheimer’s disease in that no
serious adverse events were tied to stem cell use. It is too early
to tell if these treatments will change the course of the disease
until results are published. For now, we remain cautiously
optimistic that the incredible effects of stem cells seen in
animals may also translate to the same benefits in humans.

Reference: Duncan T, Valenzuela M. Alzheimer’s disease,
dementia, and stem cell therapy. Stem Cell Res Ther. 2017;8(1):111.
Published 2017 May 12. doi:10.1186/s13287-017-0567-5

The post
Clinical Studies for Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia with Stem
Cell Therapy
appeared first on Stemedix.

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