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Adjusting to Life With Alzheimer’s Disease

If you or a family member has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s,
you’re not alone. More than 5 million people in the U.S. are
living with some form of dementia. While receiving the diagnosis is
difficult, there are still factors within your control, including
how you decide to move forward. Here are some considerations as you
adjust to a new diagnosis and things to keep in mind when adjusting
to life With Alzheimer’s Disease.

Allow yourself an emotional response.

Some people jump right into practical steps for managing

Alzheimer’s Disease
by exploring treatment options. With that
being said, it’s important to make space for the emotions you may
be experiencing. Whether you’ve been diagnosed or it’s someone
you love, you’re likely to feel a wide range of feelings. These
are normal, and give yourself grace as you feel them. Some common
emotional responses include denial, shock, anger, fear, and
sorrow.

You could find yourself feeling several different emotions at
once, or going through a cycle in which you feel them repeatedly.
There’s no right or wrong way for them to appear, and everyone
experiences them differently.

As you go through these feelings, here are some strategies that
may help you promote emotional wellbeing:

  • Journal
  • Turn to support groups, either in person or online, or a
    counselor
  • Maintain social interactions with loved ones
  • Learn as much as you can about Alzheimer’s to make informed
    decisions
  • Set up plans for the future now to alleviate future
    challenges

Support your physical wellbeing.

While Alzheimer’s leads to cognitive impairment, you’ll
still want to focus on your physical wellness. For example, get
routine checkups to ensure your hearing and vision are still
strong, as sensory impairments could exacerbate symptoms such as
confusion.

Exercise can also help keep you active and physically well, and
there is also evidence to suggest physical activity can improve a person’s
ability to perform activities of daily living
(ADLs) in people
with dementia. Be sure to follow a well-rounded diet to give your
mind and body ample nutrients as well. Some foods, such as berries,
leafy greens, nuts, and fish, appear to have
cognitive benefits

Additionally, give your brain a workout, too. Do crosswords,
Sudoku, or other puzzle games to exercise your mental abilities,
too. 

Stay socially engaged.

Social
interactions have a beneficial effect
on several key brain
functions. Thus, while you may feel tempted to withdraw from loved
ones, it’s important to stay socially active. If you’re the
loved one of a person who has recently been diagnosed, be sure to
learn as much as possible about symptoms and behavioral changes so
you know what to expect. Or, if you have Alzheimer’s, seek
support groups in which the whole family can learn so everyone is
on the same page. This can help to facilitate strong family
support. 

Of course, socializing outside the family is beneficial, too.
The Alzheimer’s
Association website
lists support groups that meet regularly.
Many people find it helpful to meet with others who have a
firsthand understanding of the challenges they’re facing.

Implement strategies to ease your routine. 

There are several tips you can try to help you maintain your
confidence. For instance, tactics such as carrying a notepad,
keeping a list of phone numbers near your phone, and maintaining a
written schedule for each day are memory aids that can help you
stay on track. You can also use devices like pillboxes to keep
track of medication. Don’t hesitate to ask for assistance with
certain tasks when needed, too. Simply having someone remind you of
important events could be helpful. If you are interested in
learning more about life with Alzheimer’s Disease then Contact us today!

The post
Adjusting to Life With Alzheimer’s Disease
appeared first on
Stemedix | Regenerative
Medicine Also Known As Stem Cell Therapy
.

If you or a family member has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s,
you’re not alone. More than 5 million people in the U.S. are
living with some form of dementia. While receiving the diagnosis is
difficult, there are still factors within your control, including
how you decide to move forward. Here are some considerations as you
adjust to a new diagnosis and things to keep in mind when adjusting
to life With Alzheimer’s Disease.

Allow yourself an emotional response.

Some people jump right into practical steps for managing

Alzheimer’s Disease
by exploring treatment options. With that
being said, it’s important to make space for the emotions you may
be experiencing. Whether you’ve been diagnosed or it’s someone
you love, you’re likely to feel a wide range of feelings. These
are normal, and give yourself grace as you feel them. Some common
emotional responses include denial, shock, anger, fear, and
sorrow.

You could find yourself feeling several different emotions at
once, or going through a cycle in which you feel them repeatedly.
There’s no right or wrong way for them to appear, and everyone
experiences them differently.

As you go through these feelings, here are some strategies that
may help you promote emotional wellbeing:

  • Journal
  • Turn to support groups, either in person or online, or a
    counselor
  • Maintain social interactions with loved ones
  • Learn as much as you can about Alzheimer’s to make informed
    decisions
  • Set up plans for the future now to alleviate future
    challenges

Support your physical wellbeing.

While Alzheimer’s leads to cognitive impairment, you’ll
still want to focus on your physical wellness. For example, get
routine checkups to ensure your hearing and vision are still
strong, as sensory impairments could exacerbate symptoms such as
confusion.

Exercise can also help keep you active and physically well, and
there is also evidence to suggest physical activity can improve a person’s
ability to perform activities of daily living
(ADLs) in people
with dementia. Be sure to follow a well-rounded diet to give your
mind and body ample nutrients as well. Some foods, such as berries,
leafy greens, nuts, and fish, appear to have
cognitive benefits

Additionally, give your brain a workout, too. Do crosswords,
Sudoku, or other puzzle games to exercise your mental abilities,
too. 

Stay socially engaged.

Social
interactions have a beneficial effect
on several key brain
functions. Thus, while you may feel tempted to withdraw from loved
ones, it’s important to stay socially active. If you’re the
loved one of a person who has recently been diagnosed, be sure to
learn as much as possible about symptoms and behavioral changes so
you know what to expect. Or, if you have Alzheimer’s, seek
support groups in which the whole family can learn so everyone is
on the same page. This can help to facilitate strong family
support. 

Of course, socializing outside the family is beneficial, too.
The Alzheimer’s
Association website
lists support groups that meet regularly.
Many people find it helpful to meet with others who have a
firsthand understanding of the challenges they’re facing.

Implement strategies to ease your routine. 

There are several tips you can try to help you maintain your
confidence. For instance, tactics such as carrying a notepad,
keeping a list of phone numbers near your phone, and maintaining a
written schedule for each day are memory aids that can help you
stay on track. You can also use devices like pillboxes to keep
track of medication. Don’t hesitate to ask for assistance with
certain tasks when needed, too. Simply having someone remind you of
important events could be helpful. If you are interested in
learning more about life with Alzheimer’s Disease then Contact us today!

The post
Adjusting to Life With Alzheimer’s Disease
appeared first on
Stemedix | Regenerative
Medicine Also Known As Stem Cell Therapy
.

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